Archive for

Devon’s Rich Historic Landmarks

The county of Devon boasts a history and heritage just as rich as its landscapes and wildlife. As a legacy of its history Devon has been left with some wonderful landmarks that are just waiting to be explored during a holiday in Devon.

The oldest of Devon’s landmarks dates back an amazing 400 millions years. Kents Caverns is one of the most important cave systems in the whole of the UK and has been home to eight different native populations that have lived in England over thousands and thousands of years. The caves are protected as they are the most important prehistoric cave dwellings in the country and are known across the world for their record of prehistoric people living in Europe. A tour of the caves offers a fascinating insight in to how ancient humans lived as well as the chance to see rock formations that have been hundreds of millions of years in the making.

Exeter Cathedral is one of the most beautiful cathedrals found in the South West. The cathedral lies in the heart of the city of Exeter and is dedicated to St. Peter. The cathedral was founded in 1050 and the building we see today was completed in the early 1400’s. It is home to the longest uninterrupted vaulted ceiling in England, other features include the Astronomical Clock, the 14th century Minstrels gallery, the bishop’s throne and the great east window.

DartmouthCastlehas to be one of the prettiest fortresses in the country. For over 600 years, the castle has sat on a picturesque spot at the entrance to the Dart Estuary and the port of Dartmouth. The castle saw action in the Civil War and continued to be used for military use right up till the Second World War. The well persevered fort has plenty of passages, rooms and fortifications to explore, displays throughout the castle halls bring 600 years of history to life. Climb to the top of the gun tower, the first tower built in Britain to hold heavy ship sinking guns, and see how the estuary could be blocked to enemy ships using a heavy chain, it will also offer some gorgeous views of the estuary.

Sacred Land of the Heart – Spirituality of the Soul’s History

I can only imagine the tremendous value of the land so far as both the people of antiquity and the Indigenous are concerned. I have to concur. The Land, for me also, has tremendous power and significance about it. Land is sacred to the heart. Our histories are indelibly attached to it.

I took the opportunity recently to re-trace some of my personal heritage. I have found that cherishing the land is a big part of cherishing my heritage–it’s about cherishing the very parts that have ‘become me.’
Re-tracing my heritage “trails” involved both old land and new land; reflecting over times significant in the past as well as foreseeing the significance of events–or certainly landmarks–of the future.

Watching the land is amazing. How it changes. A place I went back to was the land of my grandmother’s–I stayed with her for a few months, now over twenty years ago. She has since passed away long ago and the block of units we lived in has long been swept away. The whole area looks vastly different. I also visited my favourite university cafĂ© and found the menu had changed–no more cheap and ‘to die for’ food there! And whilst these things had changed, the land had not. I’m thankful to God for that fact!

What of the New Land?

A time of change is not just sad, it’s a happy time too as we gain anticipation of what the new time–a new season–might bring. New routines, new surroundings–a totally fresh environment. Watching the land gives way also to respecting the land. It’s vital that we respect it; not simply physically–but spiritually too. To cherish the land’s role in our lives, and let the memories live on; this is what I mean.

The land is inherently part of our heart. It is sacred just as our hearts are. The testimony of our memories gives the land this treasured legacy as both the means to and manifestation of our heart. The Land is the context of life. It is God’s landscape for meaning.